Archive for the ‘Mike’ Category

A strong wind blows: Environmental effects for RPGs

This entry is part 2 in the series House Rules from The Adventurer's Club

This entry is part 2 in the series House Rules from The Adventurer’s Club This is part 2 of a series presenting the various House Rules that have been introduced into the Pulp Campaign that I co-GM. Today I’m presenting some cold, heat, wind-chill, and altitude tables that were developed for the campaign in preparation […]

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House Rules – For Pulp (and other RPGs)

This entry is part 1 in the series House Rules from The Adventurer's Club

This entry is part 1 in the series House Rules from The Adventurer’s Club This is the first of a four-part* series outlining the house rules that Blair Ramage and I have adopted over the years for the Adventurer’s Club campaign, a Pulp-genre campaign run using Pulp Hero, which is a Pulp-genre variation on the […]

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The Best Of 2011

This entry is part 3 in the series The Best

A list of the hand-picked best posts from Campaign Mastery that were published in 2011

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Who Are You? – An original character naming approach

I was half-listening to the commentary from the Tour De France a few moments ago (as I write the first draft of this opening paragraph), and I misheard something. No great surprise there, that happens all the time when you’re only half-listening. But what I thought I heard gave me a great idea for a […]

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Touchstones Of Unification Pt 3 – The Big Picture (Genre and Style)

This entry is part 3 in the series Touchstones Of Unification

This entry is part 3 in the series Touchstones Of Unification So we’ve looked at Themes, and we’ve looked at Concepts, and even touched on the relationship between the two. But now it’s time to address the elephant in the room – twin elephants in fact – Genre and Style, and how these modify that […]

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The Flunkie Equation – quick and easy Hors d’Combat

A few weeks ago, I described my processes for creating Partial NPCs, a methodology that determined how much NPC definition was needed for that NPCs role in an adventure, in Creating Partial NPCs To Speed Game Prep. This was described as essential know-how for the article that I was originally going to write and publish […]

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Touchstones Of Unification Pt 2 – Concepts

This entry is part 2 in the series Touchstones Of Unification

Part 2 of the article trilogy looks at concepts within an RPG, how they relate to the campaign themes, and throws in some free game content as a bonus.

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Writing The Game: Using RPGs to Create Fiction

The Perils, pitfalls, and potential benefits of using an RPG to write a fantasy novel.

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Touchstones Of Unification Pt 1 – Themes

This entry is part 1 in the series Touchstones Of Unification

This entry is part 1 in the series Touchstones Of UnificationI was watching an interview with Jim Keays from 1975 the other day, discussing what was then his latest album. He was explaining that he had started with three or four songs that all had similar subject matter, and realized that he could build the […]

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One Spot 3 and the shift to Pre-Product Marketing

A review of One Spot No. 3 from Moebius Adventures and some musings on a consequence of the rise of crowdfunding.

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Vampire’s Creep and other stories: Working With Places

What’s the first thing you think about when considering a location in an RPG? There’s no one right answer to that question. A lot depends on why I’m thinking about that location at all. Location: a place for things to happen A location is not a simple thing to pin down. Let’s say that we’re […]

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Creating Partial NPCs To Speed Game Prep

How much character do you need? Or, to phrase it another way, how much character construction do you have to undertake in advance when creating an NPC? You could simply have a random character generator throw up something to avoid any character construction, but the results never seem to mesh properly with the situation in […]

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