Archive for the ‘Shards Of Divinity (D&D 3.5)’ Category

Tales from the front line: The Initiative Conflict

This entry is part 1 in the series Tales from the front line

This entry is part 1 in the series Tales from the front line I originally intended to present the Tavern Generator that I promised on Monday as today’s post, but it will take longer than I initially thought. Probably one more day of designing the tables and two days to format them – largely because […]

Leave a Comment

New Beginnings: Phase 6: Mindset & Underpinnings

This entry is part 7 in the series New Beginnings

This entry is part 7 in the series New BeginningsIt’s not easy making a completely fresh start. This series examines in detail the process of creating a new campaign. What more do you need? You’ve got the basic plot, you’ve got the basic world, you have these organized so as to spread the developmental workload […]

Comments (1)

Ask The GM: Seasoning The Stew (making races feel distinctive)

Today’s question comes from all the way back in June 2010 – I’m sorry it’s taken so long to answer it! The question comes from Brett, who wrote: “I am an extremely new DM, but I have played for 7 years now. I am looking to put my players in conflict with Drow. At one […]

Leave a Comment

Seven Circles Of Hell – Creating Politics for an RPG

Politics is one of those inevitable conditions, like death and taxes, that every GM has to master to some extent because it will make its presence felt in every campaign. There’s always something more to say on the subject. In this article, I’m going to look at the basics of political relations between similarly-scaled entities; […]

Comments (1)

‘I Can Do That’ – Everyman Skills For Pulp

This entry is part 3 in the series House Rules from The Adventurer's Club

This entry is part 3 in the series House Rules from The Adventurer’s Club This is part 3 of a series presenting the various House Rules that have been introduced into the Pulp Campaign that I co-GM. Today I’m presenting everyman skill rules that were developed for the campaign, and long overdue, too. Although designed […]

Leave a Comment

Touchstones Of Unification Pt 2 – Concepts

This entry is part 2 in the series Touchstones Of Unification

Part 2 of the article trilogy looks at concepts within an RPG, how they relate to the campaign themes, and throws in some free game content as a bonus.

Comments (1)

Ask The GMs: My table runneth over (too many players)

How do you GM when you have more players than you can handle?

Comments (3)

Prodigious Performances Provided In Due Course

Back in “Exceeding the Extraordinary: The Meaning Of Feats” (April 2012), I promised that a future article would discuss the approvals process for feats, prestige classes, etc, in my 3.x Fantasy campaigns…

Leave a Comment

The Premise Of Falsehoods – Luck Vs Skill in RPGs

There’s a debate that has been fought ever since man invented games that have an element of chance has been, “Is it better to be lucky or skilled?” It’s a debate that has a number of unique resonances within the sphere of an RPG. How should a player or GM simulate a character who relies […]

Leave a Comment

Leaving Things Out: Negative Space in RPGs

“Negative Space” sounds like the sort of thing that pretentious art critics fill the air with when they have nothing of substance to contribute. It’s not some antimatter or “mirror, mirror” universe, either – though it can be either or both those things if you want. It may come as some surprise to those with […]

Comments (3)

The Bargain Arcane: Selling Magic Items

James Seals asked in the comments to Places to go and people to meet: The One Spot series from Moebius Adventures (responding to my comments about magic shops),   Mike, Can I ask – what do you do when your players want to sell magic weapons? In the past I have just allowed them to […]

Comments (13)

People, Places, and Narratives: Matching Locations to plot needs

In my first article for this month’s Blog Carnival, I asked the question ‘Location, Location, Location: How Do You Choose A Location?‘ and identified ten or eleven influences on the decision, and an approximate hierarchy within them, but was unable to offer even a guideline beyond those observations in answer to the question. Today, the […]

Comments (3)